Friday, May 15, 2015

All at The Depot: William Faulkner, President Teddy Roosevelt, Night Blooming Cereus Party, and more!

Below is an interview with James Kiernan (Tippy) McDermott and the Wyatts.  It was sent to my grandparents, Mrs. Mary Eleanor Wyatt and Dr. R. L. Wyatt, from the Bank of Holly Springs.  The bank's president at the time, S. B. Gresham, had it cut out, laminated, mounted, and sent by post to The Depot in 1978. Such thoughtfulness is one of the reasons why I love small towns. 
 
I am not positive on the citation but I believe the citation for this article is as follows:
Pryor, David.  "Old depot boasts rich history."  South Reporter [Holly Springs] 30 November 1978:  Print.

Note from S. B. Gresham, President of Bank of Holly Springs.


The Depot from late 1880's and The Depot in 1978.

The white piece of paper mentions how the Kerr and Wyatt family owned the land below and above the baggage room but not the baggage room itself.  The family bought this baggage room and the express office later.  The reason for this, not mentioned in the article, was because the railroad company thought that they might need the baggage room.  
This continues Tippy's remembrances of seeing Faulkner here at The Depot's dining room and how Faulkner mentioned Mr. McDermott (Tippy's dad) in one of his books entitled  "The Reviers." In the book, Mr. McDermott is given the name Mr. McDiarmid.
The above character description was found here:  A.N. Fargnoli, M. Golay, and R. W. Hamblin.  Critical Companion to William Faulkner:  A Literary Reference to His Life and Work. New York: Infobase Publishing, 2008. Print. p. 228.
  
This continues how Tippy saw President Teddy Roosevelt interacting with the crowd at The Depot's tracks.  Note:  1949 is not when O.B. Kerr bought and started restoring The Depot that happened around 1942.  To read more go here:  http://thehollyspringsdepot.blogspot.com/2015/02/1942-ob-kerr-moved-his-family-and.html
Read about "The Night Blooming Cereus Party"  a social event that was talked about for decades after.   




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